Using the Maya Nut Tree to Increase Tropical Agroecosystem Resilience to Climate Change in Central America and Mexico

submitted by Albert Gomez

elanadapt.net - pelicanweb.org - August 2011

CLICK HERE - CASE STUDY - Using the Maya Nut Tree to Increase Tropical Agroecosystem Resilience to Climate Change in Central America and Mexico
(10 page .PDF file)

Author affiliations: 1 International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), 2 The Maya Nut Institute

Climate predictions for Central America point to an intensification of dry conditions as a consequence of increases in temperature (around 0.6°C according to IPCC (Magrin et al., 2007)) to severe water stresses in Central America and more specifically along the Pacific side of the continent, and resource deterioration as a result of the combined impacts of climate change and demographic pressure by 2025. Brosimum alicastrum or Maya Nut is a wild-­-harvested forest product. This Nutritious seed is an excellent drought and climate change-­-resistant food for rural communities. The Maya Nut tree increases agro-­-ecosystem resilience to climate change by ensuring food security during periods of drought and after extreme wet events such as tropical depressions and even hurricanes. Its deep and extensive root system helps retain soil during natural erosion or extreme climatic events. Maya Nut trees play an important role in stabilizing riverbanks and maintaining flows from natural springs. The Maya Nut tree can be used to mitigate and adapt to the impacts of climate change and is also a good carbon sink.

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ELAN case studies: good practices

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